Language: Arabic
Source: Egerton

Description

Teghá is Arabic for "blade" but is commonly used since at least the late 19th century as a word to describe a type of Indian sword with a talwar style hilt and a very wide and deeply curved blade.1

"The broad curved sword (teghá) is in use among the Hindu Rángars and Mohamedan Rajputs." 2

-Lord Egerton of Tatton, 1880

Tegha

A north Indian teghá, possibly from Lahore.

Notes
1. See Rawson, P.S.; The Indian Sword, Herbert Jenkins, London, 1968. Page 9 and 84.
2. Lord Egerton of Tatton; Indian and Oriental Arms and Armour. Dover Publications; Revised edition, 2002. Page 105.

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With wide, pattern-welded blade.

Sold

With markings attributing it to Jalore.

€2300,-

A heavy Indian katar with substantial armor piercing blade.

€1500,-

An interesting South Indian style katar with an imported European blade.

€750,-

The katar is made of wootz steel and comes from Bikaner.

€3900,-

With a fine wootz blade with a pronounced center ridge.

Price on request
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