Language: Mandarin Chinese
Source: Classical literature

 

Description

Yāodāo xìzi (腰刀繫子) means "saber lanyard". It's the wrist strap that helps secure the saber to the wrist.1

They are usually made of silk, tied together with string or in a ball knot.

Imperial lanyardOriginal xìzi on a fine Qing imperial saber. Sold by Mandarin Mansion in 2018.

Lanyard on Qing bannerman saberA simple xìzi on a Qing bannerman saber.

Officer SainkuOfficer Sainku. Imperial Guard of the 3rd class. Baturu. Notice the lanyard wrapped firmly around his hand.
Ethnological Museum of Hamburg.

References
1. Wuti Qingwen Jian (五體清文鑑)or "Five languages compendium", a Qing imperial dictionary in Manchu, Mongolian, Uighur, Tibetan and Chinese of 1766. Published under the Qianlong emperor.

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A rather well-made example of its type.

€1500,-

A bronze processional piece with reign marks attributing it to the year 1864.

€1800,-

Such rings were worn by Qing dynasty "bannermen" as a sign of their status as a conquest elite.

€600,-

A Chinese sword guard from the 18th century with a Buddhist mantra in lantsa script.

€800,-

A very rare Chinese saber guard dating from the height of the Qing dynasty.

€1500,-

Of classic shape, with a leaf-shaped blade on a socket, connected by a cast bronze base.

€400,-