Language: Sinhala

Description

Ul pihiya (උල් පිහිය) literally means "sharp knife" in Sinhala.

Deraniyagala (1942) makes a distinction between several types. According to him, the pihā-kaetta describes the various forms of large, chopper-like knives encountered. The smaller, more delicate ones that come in a scabbard together with a stylus for writing on palm leaf, he calls ul pihiya.1 

De Silva & Wickramasinghe (2007) on the other hand state that ul pihiya is a knife with an acute point.2 Not all Sinhalese knives with a writing stylus have such an acute point.

A Sinhalese knife

A Sinhalese knife, with acute point.
Personal collection.

 

 

Sinhalese knife with stylus

A Sinhalese knife with writing stylus. Rarer, bird shaped hilt.
Sold by Mandarin Mansion, 2016.

 

Notes
1. P.E.P. Deraniyagala, Sinhala Weapons and Armor. Journal of the Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society Volume XXXV. No. 95 Part III, 7th December 1942. (Reprint, Ken Trotman, 2009.) Pages 109 - 110.
2. P.H.D.H. De Silva & S. Wickramasinghe, Ancient Swords, Daggers & Knives in Sri Lankan Museums. A Publication of National Museums of Sri Lanka, 1st Edition, 2007. Addendum, pages 1 and 2.

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